Cancer Lesson #85: Be Prepared to Be Nicknamed Curly

Cancer Lesson #85: Be prepared to be nicknamed Curly.

So, about a year after my diagnosis and eight months after my final chemo, I had actual hair. Not stubble. And not the peach fuzz I had within a few months, which my daughter found irresistible (she kept rubbing my head like it was Buddha’s belly), but actual hair.

It looked something like this. curly1Okay, it only looked like that to me.
It actually looked like this. curlyApparently, it’s not uncommon for hair to grow back dark and curly. In my case, it was definitely more curly (when it used to be only wavy), with some parts darker, and a whole lot more gray (darn!).

I didn’t complain (well, not much). After all, I had hair again. I just wondered if it would stay curly, go straight, or go back to being wavy like it was before. According to one discussion board, it could go, er grow, a variety of ways. (http://community.breastcancer.org/topic/69/conversation/698807)

Funnily enough, I got a lot of compliments on my curls. This was great, partly because I again had hair to compliment, and partly because there wasn’t not a darned thing I could do about the way it was growing.

I did find several articles online about how to care for “after-chemo” (such a nice phrase) curls including this one from About.com. They include the “buzz cut” option, and I actually met spoke a woman who got fed up enough to try the 1″ cut. She dyed it blond, and seemed happy with her choice.

There’s also a website called Naturally Curly.com  with hints on handling curly hair. I learned about “plopping,” which I meant to try, but forgot.

Instead, I wore a lot of headbands and tried to remember the crazy curls were probably temporary.

This proved to be the case. My hair eventually returned to its usual waviness, though it still isn’t as thick as I remember it. There are several possible reasons for this.

  1. I’m viewing the memory of my younger, pre-cancer self’s hair through rose-colored glasses.
  2. Chemo had a lasting effect on my follicles.
  3. I was on Anastrozole, which is known to cause hair thinning.
  4. I’m getting older, and hair sometimes thins as you age.

Realistically, it’s probably a combination of all of the above.

Still, you might remember my mantra: Happy to be here. Happy to have hair. And the second part is optional.

Nearly six years later, it’s still true.

P.S. Three months later, I checked in with this photo, captioned “Still Curly!”

still curly